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such as social security and medicare, 65%. 64% creating jobs, 64% improving public education, growing the economy, creating a business environment that allows for innovation. lowering the federal deficit actually false down to 40. not as much confidence there as a part on the other side. we been said the training faces a number of challenges including but not limited to large budget deficits, national debt, slower economic recovery, high unemployment, deep political divide on many issues. do you believe we will overcome these challenges in the foreseeable future as we've done in the past, or do you think these are unique set of challenges that are so serious that we might not be able to overcome those challenges? two-thirds of voters, 67%, say we will be able to do that. 31% have concerns about it. look at the bars across the bottom. the ones like younger voters, 18-29, confident we'll get there. african-american voters, 85%. hispanics 66. and those are the fundamentals of the democratic party, 85% of democrats saying it will improve. in which of the following closest to coming to think the presi
to the defense settlement and the objective the nhs budget and the object to the education budget, even though nhs schools are going up, and what exactly would they do? the problem is as was evident from the shadow chancellor's response, they didn't have anything to say on these matters but if they had a credible deficit plan then we would listen to the questions they ask us about the priorities of those plans. >> john stephenson. >> this cools and colleges of 270 million are extremely welcome. schools and colleges such as those in my constituency plans on the runway ready to take off, just in a little additional financial support. will the chancellor help those colleges and schools? >> i'm very happy to look personally at the case my honorable friend makes for his local education facility. these are of course other government departments but we have provided the money for education, for new free schools and academies. and i'm sure that carlyle should be looked at. >> steve reed. >> chancellor aware because of his continuing inadequate level of funding to school building which today's statemen
owned by the career education corporation, one of the major league for-profit colleges. his parents didn't have the means to pay for his education but helped him out by cosigning the loans. now the student and the parents have $103,000 in student loan debt. one of the loans has a 13% interest rate, and the balance continues to rise. this young man, young man would like to finish his degree but he can't afford to. he can't borrow any more money. he is too deeply in debt. how about that for a dilemma? $103,000 in debt, no degree. he can't borrow the money to get a degree. many of these students find out these for-profit courses they took are worthless. they don't transfer anywhere. the diplomacy themselves turn out to be worthless and many employers just laugh at them. you would never know that from the advertising these for-profit schools engage in. i had a group of students in my office this morning. they were from archbishop carroll high school, not too far from the capitol here. they are students who know a little bit about being wooed and enticed by colleges, universities. we talked a
, fundamental rights of parents to direct the education and the upbringing of their child with h special needs. this could result in forcibly transferring a disabled child from the home to government-run schools if these unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats deem it necessary, even if the senate puts reservations into this treaty." i ask that this letter -- i have two letters i'd ask that would be made a part of the record at this point. that is one of the other once coming from the concerned women of america. i ask that they be made a part of the record at this point in the journal. ferraro ithe presiding officer:s there objection? without objection. mr. inhofe: i have been an advocate of human rights around the world, ensuring that the world is accessible to those with disabilities. however, i do not support the cumbersome regulations and potentially overzealous international organizations with anti-american biases that inch - that infringe upon american society. you know, if we had not passed what i consider to be the gold standard of the disabled world when we passed -- and i do remember at
investments in the future. it takes investment in equipment and science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people don't want to consider is when we get those resources? i asked our research department of the would make a prediction from important the interest costs would be if we did nothing and the estimate without any explosion will was as follows. within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of gdp to 12% of gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d r&d fer, science jaish infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will assure that we are going to have what i call a slow-growth crisis. please take over, this is your meeting. >> one thing i don't plan to be is an economics expert. i felt this way for years it's not just about the health of our economy, it's about around the world it's going to continue to eat at us and when you put in the kind of time bombs of was the intent. it was supposed to be so hammes that congress would never permit it to happen. it's stretched and stressed at the time. i'm one that set
say the american taxpayer helps subsidize their education because many of them receive world-class training at our public and private colleges and universities, and then reluctantly return home to pursue their careers because they can't get a visa or can't get a green card here in america. we are cultivating human capital and then sending those individuals back home. now, this is an area where there is broad, broad support. my colleague, senator moran, recently wrote a letter, had a "dear colleague" letter which points out that roughly -- well, he cites in the letter that more than three-quarters of voters support a stem-type visa. he quotes in this letter, dated july 20, 2012, "87% of democrats polled, 72% of republicans polled and 65% of independents support the creation of a stem visa." and, of course, if you think about it, it's just common sense. why in the world would we want to subsidize the education of these students from other countries, train them in these highly specialized and highly desirable fields and then simply send them home? i've introduced legislation ove
of it is of their own making. you cannot start with the education of the kids, teaching them to aid israel and everything it stands for and hope to have support from the people when you make a deal like that. so there are a lot of conditions . it can't happen overnight. so does the central part of the problem is they created their own problem for acceptance of any kind of reasonable deal. >> expressed some pessimism or realism about what is likely to happen in afghanistan after the departure of substantial numbers of u.s. troops. there will be back, a senseless, to where it was before september 11th. what happens in pakistan after that? democratic, emphasis on semi. >> this just adds to the conundrum of the entire area and how we deal with it. i go back to where i started. if you have some first principles that you try to apply in any controversy and recognize that as you apply them there will be circumstances for some nuance and potential compromise has required, then you approached all of these problems the way. you have very good intelligence. you can understand what is going on with in
constituents or colleagues, he striving strio educate with facts, weaved, andh facts, with evidence, and with the truth. none of us has ever heard jon try to win an argument by belittling or berating an opponent. it is simply not in his characteristic to do so. mr. president, it has been said that a politician thinks of the next election a statesman of the next generation. this statesman of arizona expresses his philosophy of government and the obligation of government leaders this way: quote "we owe future generations the chance to live their dreams, to be successful, and, most important, to achieve true happiness by their own efforts." end quote. senator jon kyl's commitment to the security of our nation, to fiscal responsibility, and to helping those in need have earned him a reputation that is worthy of his characteristic. the people of arizona and america are grateful for his service, and i am thankful for his guidance over the years and for his friendship. we wish him all the best to come in the years before him. mr. president, there is one more tribute that i'd like to give t
's recommendations to promote job creation and economic development, education, health care, clean energy and to improve security. april. >> what are your thoughts about elijah cummings who has to be good friends at the president saying that no deal [inaudible] >> well come i didn't see the specific comments. the president has principles here he intends to stick to, which is that he will not sign an extension of the bush era tax cuts for the top 2%. full stop, he will not sign a bill that extends those tax rates for the top 2%. we can't afford it. it's not a wise economic policy. it's not wise fiscal policy and it would defeat the principle of balance he has embraced so clearly throughout these negotiations. he is fully committed to extending tax cuts for the vast majority of the american people. 90% any wishes the house of representatives would pass the bill tomorrow and he would sign it right away. that is a principle he takes in today's. i don't want to forecast in a pessimistic way because i believe in the president and secretary geithener least we can achieve a compromise here. what
education in how to reform programs be the number one thing you would do, you can do as a freshman minority speakers i don't think there's a number one thing. there's a number of things. we got to get them all. the biggest obstacle we face in the 21st century doesn't look like the 21st century. not just in a jewel to graduate high school. still continues to be a significant part of folks that are going into college but it's also the 38 year old who decided to go back to school and get a degree. that was my sister. it's also the 25 year old that's after 10 years of being out of high school has been stuck in a service area jobs and deciding they want to empower themselves to that greatness is that technological advance our not only going to lower the time and costs of getting that kind of skill acquisition but are going to make it much more accessible. we have to make sure it is her student aid programs don't stand in whether. let me give you an example. right now what we have is student aid like pell aid like pell grants or the loan programs, they have credit institutions. they don't have cr
that says it's not all right to keep kids out of school and away from education because they have a physical disability, they use a wheelchair. or an intellectual disability. you would think we would want to be part of an effort like that that says it is not okay to put people in cells, chained to cells, whose only crime is that they are disabled. you would think we would want to be part of that effort. we've done that in this country. we've done wonderful things. and yet some fear, some unfounded fear that the united nations is going to come in with a black helicopter or something, i don't know what, and say you can't home school your kids. absolutely -- look, the americans with disabilities act, we've had it for 22 years. did it stop home schooling? of course not. did it lead to more abortions? of course not. mr. president, after this vote vote, after it was defeated, i walked out into the reception room, the senate reception room. there were a throng, a number of people that in the disability community, they were crushed. just crushed. they could not understand this. how could it be? ever
beencountry with limited resources, --girls do not get an education. you can see the women are doing they are in their 30's or '40's protect these women are elite beaters. bring the work back to katmandu. . and they wanted me to wish you ec's and greetings. >>host: they blast that jewelry, the blast osprey it is a true sisterhood. >>host: it is not a charity case we love this jewelry. the red this final call, the blue. there is a lot of beaded jewelry out there this is not what you find for $50 per and the bead work looks like juleswels it is not just one shade of blue. back at >>guest: therefore shades of each of the colors you have your silver gold beads. you're really going to sparkle. you want to piece of jewelry that price is important you can deny that. when your needs are taking care of, take some pleasure in knowing you are supporting the traditional beaders. for the first time in their life they have financial freedom. >>host: for many years you could not get jewelry at of this part of the world. >>host: is the most beautiful rich plumber. it looks like diamonds are
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12